January Kinect Project – Update 1

So far, this month’s project is not moving along as quickly as I had hoped it would, but it’s ok. With the time I have had to work on stuff, I’ve already learned a lot. And because of what I learned, I’ve concluded that I have to modified my goal a bit.

To get going with this project, I’ve read a good chunk of Making Things See, which is an amazing starting point for anyone new to the Kinect, especially because it uses processing as the teaching environment. Through some of the examples in the book, I was able to piece together a quick little program that enables me to only grab image data that is within x distance and disregard the rest. It wasn’t a very complex program to put together, but once you have it working, the kinect’s limitations are obvious. At this point, it’s not perfect. I had in mind that you’d be able to easily mask out anything in the foreground, but there’s so much noise that it’s impossible to get any sort of clear defining outline. I feel like somehow averaging a person’s outline along with doing some image color comparison processing, you could get to a good point. The other problem is that the kinect’s rgb camera is also not very high-res, so even if you get close, the image isn’t going to look great.

My hope in the future is that there will be a kinect update with higher res and more depth data. In fact, I heard that an updated kinect is coming out very soon, though we’ll have to see what kind of improvements it really has. In addition to an updated kinect, I’d like to figure out if there’s a way to capture a photo with a decent DSLR and match up the data from the kinect with that to do be able to get some decent photos.

So after coming to these conclusions, I’ve decided that there were two directions I could move in. I could either continue exploring this project knowing that I have some pretty high technical fences to jump or I can take what I’ve learned so far and come up with a new direction to move in that’s more feasible. I’ve decided to pursue the second route, which entails using the kinect depth data in a way that could be visually cool and fun to play with, while also having the potential to be a nice little installation. This route also would include the use of a little openGL, which I’ve wanted to learn more about too.

More to come soon.

See Project 1 – January 2012

Greg Kepler is an interactive developer at the Barbarian Group. He started as a design student graduating from RIT with a degree in New Media Design and Imaging in 2004 and fell in love with Flash. He worked for 4 years as a designer, developer, and interactive studio manager at Iomedia and moved on to the Barbarian Group in 2010 as an interactive developer where he tries to get his hands dirty with whatever technologies he can.